Search results for “perfect”

Perfect logo

Help us choose our logo. List your three favourites and the reason for your choices.

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Bit of art, bit of history: perfect

I’m a sucker for a good story.

Just bought number 945, the smallest odd abundant number.

Smallest … odd … abundant … number. Hilarious. Brilliant.

Thanks to Seth Godin for the link.

Site Search Tags: , …

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More on perfect

Rob’s asking some good questions about perfect. A few things to note:

– He’s talking about a small company.
– The pie shop is in a local, niche market.
– This story is about you.…

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Convergence or perfect

I just spent three weeks in Alberta with my wife’s family. While we were there her grandmother passed away. At and after the funeral we spent a lot of time marveling at the impact of that little lady’s life.

Invariably, …

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Leverage brillance: embrace weakness

Problems are opportunities. What will crisis drive you to do?

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Being maker changes what?

What changes when we get more makers?

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Convert core competencies for value creation

To enjoy consistently superior performance, you need to know where to focus your practice.

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When awkward is best

For small companies, awkwardness is an oft unappreciated asset.

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The renaissance of old technologies (or the cost of new in innovation)

Seeking innovation in only new places means giving up on the value and principles intrinsic in old technologies.

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Grow your business: better, not bigger

Small businesses, gazelles, and large corporations all face enormous pressure to grow. This pressure exists whether or not growth is a good idea.

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Revolution. With who?

Ralph Waldo Emerson, History:

“Every revolution was first a thought in one man’s mind, and when the same thought occurs to another man, it is the key to that era.”

What is your revolution? When will you give …

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Walk consciously, then leap.

From Henry David Thoreau’s journal:

“Find out as soon as possible what are the best things in your composition and then shape the rest to fit them. The former will be the midrib and veins of the leaf.

There …

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Passion metric

I battle an internal suspicion that I’m too naive for business. Maybe I think too big, measure obstacles as too small, and expect too much? But maybe we live too small, ask too few important questions, focus on the middle …

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De-patterning: refining the first stage of thought

After finishing New World, New Mind I was convinced of two things. First, more attention is needed around staging our thinking processes. Second, the authors didn’t had no idea how to do it.

So, while Cuban waves tickled the beach, …

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Invite and inspire brilliance

How do we invite brilliant people to try and fail quickly, over and over again, in very small ways?

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Codex

I’ve been working, since the canoe trip this summer, to refine a few of the most important pieces I’ve written about on this site. These ideas are important to me as I seek to understand both my way forward and …

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How would you be?

When you dream of an ideal space to do what you do best, what does it look like, sound like, and feel like?

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Reviewing profound

Time away brings introspection.

Long hours in a canoe give lots of room for thought.

While I sort through those ideas – here is a compilation of favourite ideas from the past. It’s a series of posts about purpose, perfection, …

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dream job

To work with people that have embraced their brilliance. To work with people who are brilliant. People who intend to shine.

I want to work on innovation, creativity, and insight. I’m keen on educating for creativity and insight, creating markets …

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Killed by ninjas

Retro post #91

Great find by Johnnie Moore, John Kay’s article on Obliquity is excellent. Kay writes that goals are often best achieved when pursued indirectly – this is the idea of obliquity.

Like Johnnie it reminds me of …

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How to be introspective

Introversion isn't bad, it just has consequences.

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What’s in?

Retro post: September 12, 2004

(A Billy Collins poem. Rated PG)

Purity

My favourite time to write is in the late afternoon,
weekdays, particularly Wednesdays.
This is how I go about it:
I take a fresh pot of tea into …

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Purposeful thought

Action is directed by ideas. Action realizes what thinking has designed.

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Category two

Intuition drives science and entrepreneurial innovation. Why doesn't it play harder at the boardroom table?

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Just asking: Hugh on speaking out loud

Hugh, you’re doing way more talks right? I think it’s so bizarre to be able to follow you around the world, watching/listening through all these little web portals. I got a question for you: In which conversation (this

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In all its glory

Invest in knowing what perfect is and then spend the time to build it.

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People first. Marketers … later.

I’ve hit a snag with the Foundation Series. It reads like crap.

I’m still wobbly on what I ought to say so I default to obfuscation. Orwell said it best, “The great enemy of clear language is insincerity.” I’m …

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Unfussy and whole

Have you heard of Christopher Alexander? I’ve written about him before (1, 2, 3).

I’m fascinated by his ideas and have yet to read a single book he’s written. But his interests in the human response …

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Wheelbarrow: Metatags

What’s with the wheelbarrow? This is a placeholder where I want to begin to use and understand the humanity of tags.

More here.

Metatags: first derivative of thought.

Metatags are key to meta-knowledge

Clay Shirky: “Taggers …

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philologr: flummoxed

I’m a fan of words. It’s the biggest reason I love T.H. White, Billy Collins, and E.B. White — their delightful choice of words.

So, for kicks, here’s philologr: A pop of perfectly placed words in a world of abused …

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sift experiment … evolved

[posted January 16, 2006]

Below is the purpose I had for sift when I started this experiment.

I’m still all in on those ideas but I think the purpose is quickly evolving away from purely entrepreneurs and purely business. Just …

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Wheelbarrow: Metatags

What’s with the wheelbarrow? This is a placeholder where I want to begin to use and understand the humanity of tags.

Metatags: first derivative of thought.

Metatags are key to meta-knowledge

Clay Shirky: “Taggers are good at …

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I’d rather talk about $1 Million

Back to perfect, one million one-dollar products vs. one million dollar products, and all these entail:

In my …

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Less fat, more meat

Holidays, long absences (or large abscesses), and in my case a gynormous move, threaten the very foundation of something like a blog. In reality a blog is incredibly fragile. Mostly carried by the resolve of a single author, a blog …

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All parables, all together

Compiling a list of lessons, this post presents a series of parables on entrepreneurism, perfect-for-purpose, and peerless innovation.

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Better for the effort

The consequence of absolute understanding? Perfect expression. Graceful execution.

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Choices

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Master vs hack

Constraints define innovation rather than prevent it.

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Without peer

A gracefully executed work has no peer.

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What’s next?

Gambling. It’s on my TV, in my online ads, fills my email, and spams my blog. So popular, so suddenly — why?

Back in 3,500 B.C. young Egyptions were already gambling. Now, 6,000 years later, you’d think the hubbub would …

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Nosepilot

I could talk about “perfection” versus “getting it done”. Or I could show you.

Nosepilot versus LEVEL 10 DESIGN.

Who you going to hire?…

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Jedi Masters of the sift

ln the end I hope my clients don’t need me. Well, hope is a strong word — maybe it would be more honest to say that “should” be the case. I believe that my business will be more whole if …

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Just to be undecided

I’ve got a rule. If I read and highlight more than 40% of an article, I don’t summarize it. I just send the whole thing.

In today’s mad rush for productivity, a paper worthy of being nearly half covered in …

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60-second pitch: The 10 point outline

Forsaking the metaphysical (1,2,3), today we get into the tangibles of a 60-second pitch. For this I leaned heavily on the advice of Bill Joss and an article in Fast Company called Perfecting Your

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Put the pitch together

Yesterday I laid out Brad Feld’s/Chris Wand’s 13 questions for entrepreneurs and said they would lay the groundwork for a ripping good pitch. Trouble is, once you do that work, all you really get is a ripping big pile of …

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Why are you reading this?

About 100 people (give or take 50) read this blog everyday. And I don’t have a clue what you’re coming here to see.

Outside of John Husband, Kevin, Alan, Evelyn Rodriguez, John Jantsch (only because I poked fun of him), …

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Proportion

Thomas Merton, The Seven Storey Mountain

“The wonderful thing about France is how all her perfections harmonize so fully together. She has possessed all the skills, from cooking to logic and theology, from bridge-building to contemplation, from vine-growing to sculpture,

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Easy to love

Christopher Alexander just finished publishing a galloping 2,000 plus page treatise on design and living structures. There’s a small interview with him here.

Take away message: Uniqueness balances repetition.

Alexander talks about a tree full of leaves that is …

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Look!

A few days ago I met one of life’s undeclared mentors. One of those people that have seen so much, done so much, and achieved so much that nearly every idea is weighted with a multitude of applications.

One thing …

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Symphonies & physics

In the 2 September 2004 issue of Nature , Sarah Tomlin describes her recent cross-walk between physics and music. The opportunity came when she was invited to hear the product of Piers Coleman, a theoretical physicist at Rutgers University and …

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