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, written by Jeremy. Read the commentary.

An interesting note from the Nature of Insight and an article by Janet Davidson. Davidson was studying the relationship between insight and intelligence. From the table below, it’s clearly nice to be bright. The results show that highly intelligent people are more insightful (these problems require insight of one sort or another). Well, that’s to be expected. Also expected is the benefits of being cued, or guided, when working through a problem – especially if you aren’t the brightest bulb in the pack. But here’s the clincher – if cued, the average subject increased her score by 47 – 58 percent on questions requiring insight. Being cued when you’re bright doesn’t get you much, but being cued when you need some help gets a whole lotta benefit.

Insight performance by intellectual level and problem type
  High ability Average ability
Problem Type
Uncued
Cued
Uncued
Cued
Restructuring for relevance
4.2
4.3
2.3
3.4
Recombining relevant info
3.8
4.1
1.9
3.0
Solutions via past experience
4.0
4.2
2.1
3.3

See, besides being witty, pithy and plump with candour (as advised by Seth Godin) – sift is on the hunt for evidence that entrepreneurs can benefit from some guidance. Note, the intelligence of the researcher isn’t in question. That frees me up to be as dumb as an ox – I only have to find the bright answers.

Do you answer questions requiring recombination of information, less than obvious information, or a set of past experiences you haven’t built yet? If you aren’t Einstein, maybe sift can help.

Commentary

[…] ox? Filed under: General — admin @ 8:14 am I think I missed my own point last night. The sift experiment isn’t about finding bright answers. It’s about finding the righ […]